Deepest galaxy cluster ever pictured by Hubble

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The "deepest ever" image of a group of galaxies – "Pandora's Cluster" – has been captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.

The blue arcs in the picture are distant galaxies as they appeared 12 billion years ago – not long after the Big Bang.

The hidden objects are revealed through the "magnifying lens" of the cluster Abell 2744.

The image was unveiled at the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Washington DC.

It is the first in a set of super-deep views of the Universe taken by Hubble's Frontier Fields observing programme, and published on the Arxiv preprint server.

Funhouse mirror

In the foreground are the colourful spirals and elliptical galaxies of Abell 2744, a massive cluster in the constellation Sculptor.

It is nicknamed Pandora for its strange and violent formation history, which unleashed many new phenomena to astronomers.

Written By: James Morgan
continue to source article at bbc.co.uk

11 COMMENTS

  1. They all look like fully “mature” galaxies. So, it seems that along with precisely balanced particles and finely tuned cosmological constants it was all that way from the very beginning. Indeed, one would expect this of a universe that started out in an initial state of minimum entropy, of maximum order, information and usable energy. Heck! No wonder there are a growing number of scientists who are creationists.

    • In reply to #2 by johnheno:

      They all look like fully “mature” galaxies. So, it seems that along with precisely balanced particles and finely tuned cosmological constants it was all that way from the very beginning. Indeed, one would expect this of a universe that started out in an initial state of minimum entropy, of maximum o…

      Are you looking at the “blue arcs” or at the “massive cluster in the foreground”?

    • In reply to #2 by johnheno:

      They all look like fully “mature” galaxies.

      Heck! No wonder there are a growing number of scientists who are creationists.

      Who knows if numbers grow, in time there could even be a fraction of 1% who are this poorly informed!

      What is a “mature galaxy” a “mature star” or a “mature planet”????? – Must be “New fizzics”!

      • In reply to #7 by Alan4discussion:

        In reply to #2 by johnheno:

        They all look like fully “mature” galaxies.

        Who knows if numbers grow, in time there could even be a fraction of 1% who are this poorly informed!

        What is a “mature galaxy” a “mature star”…

        The article said that the early galaxies formed stars 50 times faster than the milky way does – that explains why they are so bright …..does that also mean that galaxies slow down the production of stars as they age and thus become dimmer like our present milky way ???

  2. @OP link:- In the foreground are the colourful spirals and elliptical galaxies of Abell 2744, a massive cluster in the constellation Sculptor.

    Abell’s immense gravity acts as a lens to warp, brighten and magnify more distant objects lurking in the background.

    The use of gravitational lensing ( ie. Using the bending of light by massive gravity in a similar manner to the bending and focussing of light by a lens), has allowed images to be obtained from far beyond the normal range of earth bond or orbiting telescopes.
    >

    The long exposure by Hubble reveals almost 3,000 of these background galaxies, interwoven with hundreds in the foreground.

    The faintest is 10-20 times fainter than any galaxy ever seen before.
    >

    They appear brighter thanks to the lensing phenomenon, but are also smeared, stretched and duplicated – like faces in a funhouse mirror.

    Gravitational lenses can be imperfect due to the uneven distribution of the masses creating the gravitational field, so corrections of image distortions may be needed.

    The remarkable photograph will be combined with images from Nasa’s Spitzer telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory to give new insights into the origin of galaxies and their accompanying black holes.

    It was one of three spectacular new findings by Hubble unveiled at the AAS conference.

    Four brilliant young galaxies have been pictured as they were 13.2 billion years ago – just 500 million years after the Big Bang.

    The brightest was forming stars 50 times faster than our Milky Way does today, but is only one twentieth the size.

    Big galaxies like the Milkyway have been built up by gravity attracting, collecting and merging smaller satellite galaxies together, so there was probably not enough time for such large galaxies to be built this early in the history of the universe.

  3. When I look at such pictures or up into the skies on a cloudless and clear night, I’m reminded how insignificant our little blue dot actually is and the pretentiousness of a particular primate species currently inhabiting it. jcw

    • In reply to #5 by kaiserkriss:

      When I look at such pictures or up into the skies on a cloudless and clear night, I’m reminded how insignificant our little blue dot actually is and the pretentiousness of a particular primate species currently inhabiting it. jcw

      Indeed. And the pretentiousness reaches the level of cosmic hubris when the religious hijack this incommensurable majesty and claim it as “proof” of the existence of God. The universe is immense but finite. Science has managed to evaluate its boundaries but the depth of human stupidity has yet to be fathomed.

  4. And this is with only a 2.4 meter mirror big especially for a telescope in space. They are able to get this with very long exposures. Imagine what we could see with a 4 or 5 meter space telescope.

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