Domesticated Camels Came to Israel in 930 B.C., Centuries Later Than Bible Says

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Newly published research by two archaeologists at Tel Aviv University in Israel shows that camels weren't domesticated in the eastern Mediterranean until the 10th century B.C.—several centuries after the time they appear in the Bible.

While there are conflicting theories about when the Bible was composed, the recent research suggests it was written much later than the events it describes. This supports earlier studies that have challenged the Bible's veracity as a historic document.

The biblical angle wasn't the focus of the recent research, though, just an after-the-fact observation.

The study, published late last year in Tel Aviv: Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University, concerned the introduction of domesticated camels at copper smelting sites in Israel's Aravah Valley.

The dromedary, or one-humped camel that so many tourists picture when they think of the Middle East, is mentioned in the Bible 47 times. Stories about the Jewish patriarchs—Abraham, Joseph, and Jacob—include descriptions of camels as domesticated animals. For example, Genesis 24:11 says, "And he made his camels to kneel down without the city by a well of water at the time of the evening, even the time that women go out to draw water."

Written By: Mairav Zonszein
continue to source article at news.nationalgeographic.com

11 COMMENTS

  1. At every q and a site I inhabit there is already push back against this finding. Not rational push back, but push back none the less! Most of the push back is using the bible to support the bible type of thing.

    • In reply to #1 by Neodarwinian:

      At every q and a site I inhabit there is already push back against this finding. Not rational push back, but push back none the less! Most of the push back is using the bible to support the bible type of thing.

      You are right. They will simply say the facts are wrong and the bible is right. There is NO proof they will accept if dinosaur bones won’t suffice.

      • In reply to #2 by alf1200:

        In reply to #1 by Neodarwinian:

        At every q and a site I inhabit there is already push back against this finding. Not rational push back, but push back none the less! Most of the push back is using the bible to support the bible type of thing.

        You are right. They will simply say the facts are wron…

        http://aolanswers.com/questions/secular-archeologists-rebuked_735895118238170

        One of the sillier examples of this!

      • If god can plant fossils to test our faith and tempt us into ungodly atheist perversion (sounds like fun) then disposing of older camel bones, or even recycling them into dinosaur fossils, should be a piece of cake. This evidence is purely based on the superstitious belief based system called science that erroneously proposes that God isn’t screwing with us on a daily basis, thereby making all empirical evidence worthless.

        See I should have been a preacher, like my dad. I’d have made a fortune. Send me $1000 and I’ll send you a chip of a true ancient camel bone.

        In reply to #2 by alf1200:

        In reply to #1 by Neodarwinian:

        At every q and a site I inhabit there is already push back against this finding. Not rational push back, but push back none the less! Most of the push back is using the bible to support the bible type of thing.

        You are right. They will simply say the facts are wron…

  2. If it is borne in mind that the oldest written parts of the Old Testament were written in the tenth century BCE and later, this finding concerning camels poses little difficulty. The writers, themselves taking camels for granted as part of the world they lived in and unaware that camels had been introduced as domestic animals only recently in that region, wrote camels into their records of the oral traditions they were preserving. The Patriarchs, surely, were not less advanced than those heathen sons of Ishmael!

    This is a very ordinary example of how unreliable ancient writings are as historical sources, and how the input of diverse experts is needed to assess what information about the past can be gleaned from such writings.

    • In reply to #5 by Cairsley:

      If it is borne in mind that the oldest written parts of the Old Testament were written in the tenth century BCE and later, this finding concerning camels poses little difficulty. The writers, themselves taking camels for granted as part of the world they lived in and unaware that camels had been int…

      So the people who believe in the man in the sky also were off by a thousand years?

  3. Whilst the article seems to indicate the sudden increase around 930BC in the use of camels for the trading of copper, it has little to say about the herding of camels in the area used for meat, leather and wool production, the tamest of which may well have been ridden by the camel herders many centuries before. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence as many here would usually say. The article seems to suggest that because the bones of Abraham’s camel herd have not yet been found, he couldn’t possibly have ridden one of them.

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