Air pollution reaches high levels in parts of England

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Air pollution in parts of England has reached high levels in the past 24 hours, Defra has said.

People with health problems have been warned to take particular care because of the pollution – a mix of local emissions and dust from the Sahara.

Greater London, rural areas of south-east England and East Anglia's towns and cities experienced the high levels.

People with lung or heart disease are among those warned against exercising outside in the affected areas.

The elderly could also be particularly affected by high levels of air pollution.

Defra (the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs) has a 10-point scale for measuring air quality – with level one implying a "low" risk of air pollution and 10 for "very high" levels.

On Wednesday, levels were recorded at eight – meaning high – in rural parts of south-east England and towns and cities near busier roads in East Anglia.

In London, air pollution levels were recorded at level seven, which is also in the "high" category.

Moderate levels of pollution were recorded in the Midlands, Yorkshire and Humberside, and north-west England and Merseyside.

Defra said the air pollution on Wednesday was not as high as it had been in recent days. Level 10 air pollution was recorded in north-west Norfolk on Tuesday, as well as in the East Midlands, Yorkshire and Humberside on Monday.

Levels are determined by the concentration of five pollutants in the air – ozone, sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and two types of particulate matter.

High levels of air pollution are usually reached about five times a year, Defra said.

It is predicted that high levels will be recorded on Thursday in East Anglia, the Midlands, parts of north and east Wales, areas of north-west England and south-west Scotland.

The pollution is expected to clear in most places by Friday.

BBC Weather presenter Tomasz Schafernaker said Atlantic winds would blow away the pollution, improving air quality.

Dr Keith Prowse, honorary medical adviser to the British Lung Foundation, warned higher pollution levels could have a "significant impact" on people with respiratory conditions.

Written By: BBC News
continue to source article at bbc.com

10 COMMENTS

    • In reply to #1 by Stafford Gordon:

      It’s fascinating to think that my old banger parked in the drive has got sand from the Sahara desert on it; quite exotic really.

      Further proof that we’re in a very small closed system.

      • In reply to #2 by alaskansee:

        In reply to #1 by Stafford Gordon:

        It’s fascinating to think that my old banger parked in the drive has got sand from the Sahara desert on it; quite exotic really.

        Further proof that we’re in a very small closed system.

        Precisely!

        S G

    • In reply to #1 by Stafford Gordon:

      It’s fascinating to think that my old banger parked in the drive has got sand from the Sahara desert on it; quite exotic really.

      I suppose it makes a change from the Sahara dust being dumped on the Canary Islands, the Atlantic, or the Amazon!

      The exhaust pollution is European generated, but because of low wind speeds and direction, has not blown away from the cities.

  1. Yes dust on the car, but I’m still here in London !

    Perhaps some of the oxygen I’m breathing came via the Brazilian rain forest ? Or the water I drink from the Atlantic ? To paraphrase Richard, I’m one of the lucky ones to be here.

  2. Not half as bad as the volcanic dust from Iceland a few years back – but its all part of our ecosystem in the long term – like sea fish fertilising inland forests thanks to bears…. its all connected….

  3. air pollution forecast

    The flora and fauna, how do they fare? Are not jonquils set to bloom, birds to begin nesting / mating?

    Perhaps the future is here for good. Battles over water are already being fought on fronts; fresh bagged air may fall victim to highest bidder, contraband, armoured trucks. No more Mr. Niceguy, back to basics.

    (edited)

  4. It looked like a red toxic advance of poison on the weather map creeping up from London… so sensationalised…

    Scotland missed out due to our strong Atlantic winds and elevated position keeping the Libyan Desert below the border….

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