College of Charleston Times, They Are a-Changin’

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I moved to South Carolina in 1976 to be a math professor at the College of Charleston, a school founded in 1770 that had been receiving modest publicity for its steadily improving liberal arts program. However, it became even better known in 1998 when the College's then-president Alex Sanders jokingly (I think) called its basketball team's upset of third-ranked University of North Carolina the greatest day in the college's glorious history.

Over the past few weeks, the College of Charleston has received more publicity than in its previous 244 years, as the New York TimesWashington PostMSNBC, and other national media outlets featured stories about the college. While I think almost all publicity is good, the "almost" might be applicable here because of the two controversies that led to this publicity. Each involved a choice: of a new president and of a new book.

The Board of Trustees unanimously chose state Lieutenant Governor Glenn McConnell as the next college president, despite strong opposition by faculty and students. A long time defender of the Confederacy, McConnell fought to keep the Confederate flag atop the Capitol dome. While a state senator, his Confederate memorabilia store sold items that included Maurice Bessinger's barbeque sauce, which lots of shoppers and stores were boycotting because of Bessinger's biblically justified pro-slavery tracts, and toilet paper with the image of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman.

Many were more upset with the process by which the trustees chose McConnell, who was not among search committee finalists. The trustees apparently caved to pressure from the South Carolina legislature, where McConnell had served for 30 years. In fact, a long time trustee, Daniel Ravenel, was ousted by the legislature because of hislackluster support for McConnell.

The controversial book issue involved Fun Home by Alison Bechdel, which a committee of faculty, staff, administrators, and students had picked as an option for students to read and discuss. After the college sent copies to incoming students, South Carolina legislators vociferously objected to the book because of its lesbian theme, and the House voted to remove $52,000 in funding for the college, the cost of the books. As I write this, the Senate has yet to vote on the matter.

I do see some good news. The Board of Trustees and Legislature unintentionally activated and united faculty and students as never before. When I arrived on campus in 1976, faculty and students were mostly apathetic about governance and social issues. The college had integrated less than a decade earlier, but there wasn't much intermingling between blacks and whites on campus. Students at graduation ceremonies walked onto the stage alphabetically in pairs, but some parents complained if their white daughter had to walk alongside a black male.

While Bob Dylan might have inspired a generation with his 1964 song, The Times They Are a-Changin,' it's still "not so much" in South Carolina. But better late than never, and I hope that the times are finally changing in South Carolina–at least for young people.

Glenn McConnell was a College of Charleston student back in the 60s when it was a segregated institution and students weren't even protesting the Vietnam War. However, students are now organizing and protesting against McConnell and the attempted censoring of book selections by politicians with social agendas that conflict with academic freedom. I was moved by the most recent student demonstration and speeches against suppressing Fun Home, during which a female African-American student led a mixed group of black and white, straight and gay students. What most surprised and pleased me was how comfortable these students were with such interactions and hugs. It's no longer their grandfather's College of Charleston.

I've been involved with many protests by atheists and humanists, so I was struck by how religion went unmentioned when students criticized homophobic and racist legislators. They were simply saying that bad behavior is bad behavior, whatever the motivation. And that's fine with me.

Written By: Herb Silverman
continue to source article at huffingtonpost.com

2 COMMENTS

  1. The college of Charleston decides it wants to elect as its president a man who thinks that his state still exists in a time warp of over 150 years previous. What could possibly go wrong? I suppose if they ever do a remake of the Land that time forgot then South Carolina would be a fitting place to film it.

  2. In reply to #1 by Miserablegit:

    The college of Charleston decides it wants to elect as its president a man who thinks that his state still exists in a time warp of over 150 years previous. What could possibly go wrong? I suppose if they ever do a remake of the Land that time forgot then South Carolina would be a fitting place to…

    As a resident of South Carolina, I would like to remind the above poster that the College did not want to hire this man as President. They were pressured into doing so by the state legislature. Unlike most states, South Carolina does not have a single administration for all of its public universities. Instead each university is administered with each university having nearly its entire Board of Trustees elected by the state legislature (the one exception being Clemson University, which only has 6 of its 13 BoT members selected by the government with the rest being lifetime members who select their own successor).

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