Muldrow Public Schools removes Ten Commandments postings from classrooms

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An Oklahoma school district is learning a valuable lesson thanks to a student and the Freedom From Religion Foundation. On May 1, FFRF sent a letter to Superintendent Ron Flanagan requesting that he ensure that numerous Ten Commandments postings be removed from Muldrow Public Schools classrooms. A student reported that Ten Commandments placards were on the wall in every classroom.


The letter from FFRF Staff Attorney Patrick Elliott advised that the displays were a flagrant violation of the Establishment Clause and Supreme Court precedent. While some teachers initially refused to remove the Ten Commandments postings, FFRF was informed by the school district’s attorney that they had all been removed by Friday, May 10th.

The Board of Education of Muldrow Public Schools is likely to hear requests to put the Ten Commandments back in classrooms at a Board meeting tonight. The agenda for the meeting includes allotted time for a pastor of a local church to addressing the issue.

Written By: FFRF
continue to source article at ffrf.org

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  1. Sometimes it seems like the FFRF has a truly Sisyphean task – for each hydra’s head they diligently cut off, two more appear (if I may mix my metaphors in such a fashion).

    Thank you for your tireless efforts.

    • In reply to #1 by BenS:

      Sometimes it seems like the FFRF has a truly Sisyphean task – for each hydra’s head they diligently cut off, two more appear (if I may mix my metaphors in such a fashion).

      You may – totally relevant. I suppose the boulder could be applicable, but using the hydra seems more appropriate!.

    • In reply to #1 by BenS:

      Sometimes it seems like the FFRF has a truly Sisyphean task – for each hydra’s head they diligently cut off, two more appear (if I may mix my metaphors in such a fashion).

      Thank you for your tireless efforts.

      It is very needed work, and my gratitude for FFRF can not be overstated. I don’t think the hydra analogy fits here though. The weeds need to get pulled, but they do not have a rejuvenating property. Religion is in its last throws. It continues to fester in areas where objection is not raised, and naturally children will accept their surrounding with less question. Looking back at my public education, I had to sing praises to Christ as part of my weekly ‘music class’. When we (the children) questioned the religious content (which I’m glad to say we did), we were told it was just songs and much so music came from religion. We accepted this explanation. Children have to be defended, their rights fought for by others.

      • In reply to #7 by This Is Not A Meme:

        In reply to #1 by BenS:
        last throws

        An analogy I might use is the church is like a very old tree. It has been rotting from the inside for centuries. It still looks huge and imposing, but the strength is gone.

        “Don’t worry about where you are, watch the first derivative.”

        ~ Fred Green (my Dad)

        What to look for:

        church revenue

        age distribution of supporters

        church attendance

        first responder for healing

        first responder for psychological problems

        expert on matters of science and nature

        percentage of people who meet partners through the church

        respect, trust (they lost big time by letting the pedophile ring cat out of the bag).

        belief in liturgical magic to influence events in your life.

        number of confessions taken.

        perceived as relevant to current day

    • In reply to #1 by BenS:

      Sometimes it seems like the FFRF has a truly Sisyphean task – for each hydra’s head they diligently cut off, two more appear (if I may mix my metaphors in such a fashion).

      Thank you for your tireless efforts.

      It is a Herculean task.

  2. The Board of Education of Muldrow Public Schools is likely to hear requests to put the Ten Commandments back in classrooms at a Board meeting tonight.

    Is that because some board members don’t care about the law. What a horrible thing to teach children, that the law doesn’t matter compared to what you believe. Hardly a moral lesson.

    • In reply to #2 by aquilacane:

      The Board of Education of Muldrow Public Schools is likely to hear requests to put the Ten Commandments back in classrooms at a Board meeting tonight.

      Is that because some board members don’t care about the law. What a horrible thing to teach children, that the law doesn’t matter compared to what you believe. Hardly a moral lesson.

      I both agree and disagree with you at the same time.

      On the one religious hand, of course I agree. A recent terrorist captured here in Canada said ‘the Criminal Code is not a holy book’. I’m pretty sure the rest of Canadians would prefer he follow our actual laws instead of the hideous and fictional morality found in the Quaran. Throw all religious books and references out the window as far as I’m concerned.

      On the other secular hand, however, I’m not so sure I trust legal judgement over my personal beliefs. I wouldn’t trust a cop – any cop – as far as I can throw one. My personal morals are infinitely higher and more respectable than any representative of the justice system I’ve ever met. I teach my kids to stay away from priests and cops alike. Just say yes sir, no sir in their presence and then get as far away from them as possible. Too much power concentrated in any individuals’ hands, secular or religious, can be a very bad thing.

      My personal standards and code of conduct are far more moral than written law. I want my kids to think for themselves and develop their own sense of morality, not blindly follow politically influenced laws, be they religious or secular.

      • In reply to #5 by KrustyG:

        In reply to #2 by aquilacane:

        The Board of Education of Muldrow Public Schools is likely to hear requests to put the Ten Commandments back in classrooms at a Board meeting tonight.

        Is that because some board members don’t care about the law. What a horrible thing to teach children, that the law do…

        And, I both agree and disagree with you. While I may know that my ethical take on something is of a higher calibre than the law and many of those who are sworn to uphold it, I still don’t break the law or teach that it should be broken (excuse my pot smoking for a second), I will endeavor to change the law. Many of us here are in the process of doing just that with the liable laws in the UK, same sex marriage around the world and even pot smoking.

        There is also the other side to the argument. Where one knows they are running fowl of the law but are willing to accept the consequences of doing so as compared to those who run fowl of the law but are not willing. Law is far more important than we give it credit. I don’t know why it isn’t taught as a class in school. It is the only thing we are required to actually know, by law.

      • In reply to #5 by KrustyG:

        In reply to #2 by aquilacane:
        not a holy book

        The law indeed, is not a holy book. We can change it an any time. It is not carved in stone.

        It is also not a holy book because Canada has engaged in an illegal war against Afghanistan. We committed the exact same crime we hanged Nazis for at the end of WWII, namely aiding and abetting an “aggressive” first strike war. We have no right to just assume everything Canada does is, by definition, righteous. The law is a creation of fallible politicians. Canada’s law is unusually malodorous just now because of the tinkering by a would-be military dictator Stephen Harper.

        Mankind has plenty of experience, that almost any legal system is preferable to none, i.e. rule by man, made up as you go, or theocracy (rule by dead people who made up invariant rules.).

  3. Why is it that educators, of all people, seem to be congenitally incapable of understanding their own country’s Constitution? The language is not all that challenging, surely?

    I would expect this sort of crap in a UK faith school, but I’m happy to concede that on this topic America is light years ahead of us. Don’t let them turn the clock back.

    • Steve,
      Constitutionally, the US may be light years ahead but in my UK RC youth, that is my entire schooling up to university, I never encountered the 10 Commandments pinned to the wall. Crucifixes everywhere and statues of the Virgin Mary but never in your face dogma in that sense. An interesting difference…

      In reply to #4 by Stevehill:

      Why is it that educators, of all people, seem to be congenitally incapable of understanding their own country’s Constitution? The language is not all that challenging, surely?

      I would expect this sort of crap in a UK faith school, but I’m happy to concede that on this topic America is light years a…

  4. Please try applying some reason to this. Grasp that they know exactly what they are doing and they are doing it intentionally. Without understanding their strategy and tactics you can’t understand their actions. From their point of view these are win-win situations. They get enormous publicity and attention.They are setting forrest fires all over the place on multiple issues – evolution, prayer, separation, birth control, abortion, etc. It forces multiple responses which absorb the time, attention, energy and funds of whoever has to respond. They have their opposition beat when it comes to funding, manpower, coordination, discipline and political power.

    If they get their way, they win. If they lose a fight, it energizes them, becomes a rallying point, increases polarization, helps recruitment. I’ve been posting a link to an article that gives a perspective (new to me) on the the logic that seems to underlie this movement. We might think they’re nuts but that does’t mean they can’t win or cause a lot of damage.

  5. I wonder which set of commandments it was, because there is more than one set mentioned in the buy-bull. There is no such thing as “thee” ten commandments. Even their rock-solid foundations supposedly written in stone turn out to be a subjective collection. And even if you leave atheist students out of the equation, one particular christian interpretation is being foisted on all the other christians.

    • In reply to #10 by Dave H:

      I wonder which set of commandments it was, because there is more than one set mentioned in the buy-bull. There is no such thing as “thee” ten commandments. Even their rock-solid foundations supposedly written in stone turn out to be a subjective collection.

      Yep! Lots of “reinterpretation” in the different versions!

      Enumeration of the Ten Commandments

      Some may find these bible quotes amusing! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible-errata

      • “Wicked Bible”, “Adulterous Bible” or “Sinner’s Bible” **1631: Barker and Lucas: Omits an important “not” from Exodus 20:14, making the seventh commandment read **”Thou shalt commit adultery.” The printers were fined £300 and most of the copies were recalled immediately. Only 11 copies are known to exist today.
      • “The Fools Bible”: 1763: Psalm 14:1 reads “the fool hath said in his heart there is a God”, rather than “…there is no God”. The printers were fined £3,000 and all copies ordered destroyed.
      • “Affinity Bible” 1927: Contains a table of family affinities that includes the line “A man may not marry his grandmother’s wife.”

      …an amazing anticipation of gay marriage!!!!!! – another miracle???

      There are many more on the link!

  6. I object to the ten commandments on five grounds.

    1. They violate the principle of separation of church and state. It is wrong to impose religious superstition on non-believers. Christians historically have preferred to die than submit to that mistreatment.

    2. Nobody, even Christians, means them. “likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth” abound. Even Muslims create flower images. Sunday shopping abounds. Coveting is the basis of the economy. Professional killers are the most respected citizens.

    3. There is no definitive version of them. See Deuteronomy 5:7, Exodus 20:1, Exodus 34:13-28. There are many versions of the bible as well.

    4. Almost any child could come up with a better set of ten moral or legal rules. The ten commandments are incompetent, obsolete and silly.

    5. Jehovah and his followers pay absolutely no attention to these rules, as described in the old testament. Jehovah routinely commands his followers to violate them.

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