The Ultimate Apocalypse Cuisine: A 12-Course Meal in a Can

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Behold: A 12-course meal … in a can!


On paper, it sounds delectable. You start with a selection of local cheeses, followed by pickled Kobe beef. Then there’s ricotta ravioli, Shiitake mushrooms, and halibut poached in truffle butter. After a few more dishes, following a pear ginger juice palate cleanser, you’ll arrive at the main course: a rib eye steak with grilled mustard greens. The feast comes to a close with a French canelé and a hazelnut latte. Divine! Just one thing: You’ll be eating it all in the form of a wobbling gelatinous tower.
 

The 12-course meal in a can was created by Chris Godfrey, a student at Kingston University in London, as part of a dissertation on today’s bombastic consumerism. Fascinated with the extravagant gimmicks companies use to get us to buy their products, Godfrey got to wondering what the competing trends driving contemporary consumer culture–our love of “quality” products, and our even greater love of utter, braindead convenience–might look like at their obvious, revolting conclusion. And thus the “All in One” was born.

 

It’s probably the most decadent zombie apocalypse ration ever conceived. But you can’t accuse Godfrey of false advertising: Each layer of his gourmet stack really consists of what it says on the label. That wasn’t an easy process. First Godfrey prepared all the dishes on the menu; then he ran them through a food processor and meticulously combined each with gelatin. “They were individually poured, one by one, on top of each other, with each layer taking around 60 minutes to process and set,” he explains. “It was a long day.”

Not long enough, though, for him to work up an appetite for his cylindrical creation. Godfrey says the piece is supposed to be a humorous reflection on consumer culture. “It’s not a statement on the food industry so much,” he says, “nor was it ever made for consumption.” In other words, it’s food for thought, not dinner.

Written By: Kyle VanHemert
continue to source article at wired.com

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  1. Meh, I’ve been to Scotland. This can wouldn’t give anyone who’s ever eaten haggis or deep-fried pizza a moment’s pause. Get enough Buckfast or Tennent’s Extra into your system and Mr Godfrey’s gelatinous concoction will start to look pretty appetising.

  2. In reply to #5 by Katy Cordeth:

    If you’re looking for disgusting food in a can, there’s always this.

    That’s solid marketing right there. It comes equipped with some sort of “Disaster Preparedness”. I’d like to get my hands on some of that, it sounds awesome.

  3. In reply to #5 by Katy Cordeth:

    In reply to #4 by locka:

    I’d have to say, I’d be tempted to buy one.

    If you’re looking for disgusting food in a can, there’s always this.

    Yum! I foolishly had to go and look at canned food for myself.

    These 14 cans could be taped together for an apocalyptic-just-kill-me-now blow out…

    But what to start with? Pork brains in milk gravy or the fish mouths?

    • In reply to #8 by phil rimmer:

      Yum! I foolishly had to go and look at canned food for myself.

      These 14 cans could be taped together for an apocalyptic-just-kill-me-now blow out…

      But what to start with? Pork brains in milk gravy or the fish mouths?

      Oh dear, the time I’ve spent reading online articles that have some combination of a numeral, the adjective ‘strangest’ or some variation of the same – creepiest, oddest etc – and a noun.

      The internet people must employ some sort of random generator using the formula n + a + n = mwokt

      I’ve already opened ’25 Actore Before They Were Famous’, ‘The 30+ Ugliest Former Child Actors’, ’10 Medical Professionals Who Were Actually Murderers’ and ’12 Of The Worst Song Titles Ever’ in new tabs.

      Tim Berners Lee and Al Gore must be spinning in their graves.

      The whole cooked chicken being schlurped out of its can reminds me of the DVD they showed us in school of some lady giving birth.

      That delicious-looking cheeseburger actually looks like this.

      And Number 11, Canned Roasted Crickets With Eggs, is just wrong. You can’t have canned eggs.

  4. It was just an excuse for Chris to eat all those fancy meals while putting just a little of each aside for the project. I wonder if he had grant money, like a grad student I knew who had the University fly live Mane lobsters to California each week for his neurophysiology work.

    • In reply to #9 by Quine:

      It was just an excuse for Chris to eat all those fancy meals while putting just a little of each aside for the project. I wonder if he had grant money, like a grad student I knew who had the University fly live Mane lobsters to California each week for his neurophysiology work.

      This is possibly the ethical way to go if animals are to be experimented on. The experimenters have to eat whats left. I’ve always argued lobsters might be the most ethical nosh anyway having the same number of neurons as a fruitfly or for that matter be no more complex than a fancy micro controlled temperature regulator. Yum. Lobster Thermostat.

    • In reply to #14 by Johnny_O:

      Having been in the army, I can tell you that this is nothing new. We’d regularly have an “All In”, then maybe add curry powder if we were feeling adventurous

      I’ve heard tell that u.s. military folk during WWII turned up noses at the oft served “sos” – s**t on a shingle.
      Translated – chipped beef w/ white sauce on toast. Tried it once; good stuff Maynard :p

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