Czech Republic: Wolves return after a century absence

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A hidden camera has captured an image of a wolf crossing a wooded clearing in the Czech Republic, a hundred years after the predator disappeared from the area, it's been reported.

There have been some signs near the town of Doksy suggesting a wolf may be in the region, Radio Prague reports. But wolves haven't roamed free in Bohemia since the late 19th Century.

Right now, there is probably just one wolf or maybe a pair, says environmental expert Miroslav Kutal. The animal is likely to have strayed into Bohemia from the border regions of Germany and Poland, where the wolf population has been thriving.

Written By: BBC News
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12 COMMENTS

  1. A little pebble of good environmental news in the daily avalanche of climate and environmental disaster. There’s nothing like seeing nature make a comeback. Now, if only we could get some wolves back in Olympic National Park, in my home state. The National Park has a mandate to do so, but it keeps getting blocked by local livestock owners and people who think Big Bad Wolves might rampage out of the forest and snatch little tykes right off the swingsets in the school playground. Wolves are making a natural comeback in most of the northwest – they’re migrating in from Canada and establishing packs, but we’ve got the manly men types who see them as vermin competing with them for their big game trophies, and they’re always trying to get wolves off the Endangered Species list in their states and even start killing them for bounties again.

    • In reply to #2 by Sue Blue:

      A little pebble of good environmental news in the daily avalanche of climate and environmental disaster. There’s nothing like seeing nature make a comeback. Now, if only we could get some wolves back in Olympic National Park, in my home state. The National Park has a mandate to do so, but it keep…
      Hello Sue Blue, I live on the Coast. OS?

  2. Beautiful creatures.

    I think I’m right in saying that unlike a hundred years ago it’s now understood that if left alone their numbers self correct and remain stable and they keep to themselves.

    It was myths about them which caused their slaughter apparently.

    • In reply to #3 by Stafford Gordon:

      Beautiful creatures.

      I think I’m right in saying that unlike a hundred years ago it’s now understood that if left alone their numbers self correct and remain stable and they keep to themselves.

      It was myths about them which caused their slaughter apparently.

      Unfortunately that does not appear to be the case or not what is understood by local farmers. They do do a tremendous amount of good but they will always need a massive amount of space without tasty lamb to be able to resist temptation. They are a vital part of a health eco system, sheep farming on alpine meadows isn’t.

      I’ve been surrounded by a 30 strong pack while dog sledding but I also live in a national park where the only sheep are wild and no one is counting them. With generations of shepherds in various parts of the almost or formerly wild world it’s always going to be a conflict. Various European and the US have culls in place.

  3. In reply to #4 by alaskansee:

    In reply to #3 by Stafford Gordon:

    Beautiful creatures.

    I think I’m right in saying that unlike a hundred years ago it’s now understood that if left alone their numbers self correct and remain stable and they keep to themselves.

    It was myths about them which caused their slaughter apparently.

    Un…

    You’re right of course, and the same applies to Badgers and cattle, the former having evolved naturally, the latter all bred by humans from the Oryx, but the poor old Badger has to be culled because it carries Tuberculosis, which transmits to cattle.

    The same applies to Foxes and poultry, the latter having all been bred from Red junglefowl. Deer and tree cultivation and Birds and cats all pose problems, and probably insuperable ones.

  4. I think there is a reason they have been wiped out over most of europe.
    I wouldnn’t want to see one death of a human to wild dogs. it’s just not worth the warm cozy feeling it gives to enviromentalists and I am one.

    • In reply to #6 by jjbircham:

      I think there is a reason they have been wiped out over most of europe.
      I wouldnn’t want to see one death of a human to wild dogs. it’s just not worth the warm cozy feeling it gives to enviromentalists and I am one.

      Google “wolf attack on humans”.Extremely rare. I live around Coyotes and Wolves. They don’t attack humans on a normal basis. If you want to wipe out everything that could pose a danger, you might want to move to the city. Much safer there right?
      If you want to be afraid of something in the wild, we should be afraid of Cougars.
      Wolves also prey on deer that graze on meadows that damage them. There is a report here at the Dawkins site somewhere where the wolves have contributed to the grasslands return.

  5. While it may be true that the core of Bohemia had been free of wolves for some decades, it does not apply to the Czech Republic and of course not to the former CSSR.
    I spent some rough but beautiful winters in the Tatra Mountains as a child during the 80ies, and there wore enough wolves and some occasional bears roaming around my uncles hut.

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