1.2-Million-Year-Old Stone Tool Unearthed in Turkey

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Image credit: Royal Holloway University of London

By Sci-News

Although Paleolithic stone tools have been found in western Turkey before, few have been associated with geological deposits of known age. As a result, the timing of early humans’ progress across the Anatolian peninsula is poorly understood.

The newfound stone tool is composed mainly of quartz and is about 5 cm long.

It shows evidence of being hammered by a hard tool and, according to the scientists, is at least 1.2 million years old.

“The flake was an incredibly exciting find. I had been studying the sediments in the meander bend and my eye was drawn to a pinkish stone on the surface. When I turned it over for a better look, the features of a humanly-struck artifact were immediately apparent,” said Prof Danielle Schreve of Royal Holloway University of London, UK, who is a co-author of the paper published in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews.


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5 COMMENTS

  1. It shows evidence of being hammered by a hard tool and, according to the scientists, is at least 1.2 million years old.

    Datable tools are always useful in tracking prehistoric migrations.

  2. Maybe the first migrants didn’t survive long, or didn’t get much further than Turkey. Granted that finds are expected to be scarce, but this does seem ‘out on a limb’ in age terms, doesn’t it?

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